README: Rephrase "Implementation details."
authorDavid Thompson <dthompson2@worcester.edu>
Mon, 19 Oct 2015 15:47:18 +0000 (11:47 -0400)
committerDavid Thompson <dthompson2@worcester.edu>
Mon, 19 Oct 2015 15:47:18 +0000 (11:47 -0400)
README

diff --git a/README b/README
index dfed354..28df55d 100644 (file)
--- a/README
+++ b/README
@@ -35,13 +35,12 @@ converted to HTML (via SXML) or any other format for rendering.
 
 * Implementation details
 
-  Very simple monadic parser combinators (purposely lacking support
-  for recursive grammars currently) are used to tokenize the
-  characters within a string or port and return a list consisting of
-  two types of values: strings and two element tagged lists.  A tagged
-  list consists of a symbol designating the type of the text (symbol,
-  keyword, string literal, etc.) and a string of the text fragment
-  itself.
+  Very simple monadic parser combinators (supporting only regular
+  languages) are used to tokenize the characters within a string or
+  port and return a list consisting of two types of values: strings
+  and two element tagged lists.  A tagged list consists of a symbol
+  designating the type of the text (symbol, keyword, string literal,
+  etc.) and a string of the text fragment itself.
 
   #+BEGIN_SRC scheme
     ((open "(")
@@ -65,12 +64,14 @@ converted to HTML (via SXML) or any other format for rendering.
      (close ")"))
   #+END_SRC
 
-  This means that the parsers are *not* intended to produce the
-  abstract syntax-tree for any given language.  They are simply to
-  attempt to tokenize and tag fragments of the source.  A "catch all"
-  rule in each language's parser is used to deal with text that
-  doesn't match any recognized syntax and simply produces an untagged
-  string.
+  The term "parse" is used loosely here as the general act of reading
+  text and building a machine readable data structure out of it based
+  on a set of rules.  These parsers perform lexical analysis; they are
+  not intended to produce the abstract syntax-tree for any given
+  language.  The parsers, or lexers, attempt to tokenize and tag
+  fragments of the source.  A "catch all" rule in each language's
+  highlighter is used to deal with text that doesn't match any
+  recognized syntax and simply produces an untagged string.
 
 * Requirements