Fix a few errors in the manual. master
authorDavid Thompson <dthompson2@worcester.edu>
Wed, 5 Jun 2019 11:47:44 +0000 (07:47 -0400)
committerDavid Thompson <dthompson2@worcester.edu>
Wed, 5 Jun 2019 11:47:44 +0000 (07:47 -0400)
doc/api.texi

index 5d7623b..ebac327 100644 (file)
@@ -21,7 +21,7 @@ and exit points to the Chickadee game loop kernel.
 
 On its own, the kernel does not do very much at all.  In order to
 actually respond to input events, update game state, or render output,
-the programmer must provide an engine.  But don’t worry, you don’t
+the programmer must provide an engine.  But don't worry, you don't
 have to start from scratch!  Chickadee comes with a simple engine that
 uses SDL to create a graphical window and handle input devices, and
 OpenGL to handle rendering.  This default engine is enough for most
@@ -31,7 +31,7 @@ Perhaps you are writing a text adventure or roguelike that reads from
 and writes to a terminal instead of a graphical window.  The game loop
 kernel makes no assumptions.
 
-@deffn {Procedure} run-game [#:update] [#:render] [#:time] [#:error] @
+@deffn {Procedure} run-game* [#:update] [#:render] [#:time] [#:error] @
        [#:update-hz 60]
 
 Start the game loop.  This procedure will not return until
@@ -1889,7 +1889,7 @@ Draw the string @var{text} with the first character starting at
 built-in font is used.
 
 @example
-(draw-text font "Hello, world!" (vec2 128.0 128.0))
+(draw-text "Hello, world!" (vec2 128.0 128.0))
 @end example
 
 To render a substring of @var{text}, use the @var{start} and @var{end}